Nietzsche says, in effect, that between Plato, Augustine, and the Buddhist there’s “not a dime’s worth of difference

Questions

  1. Nietzsche says, in effect, that between Plato, Augustine, and the Buddhist there’s “not a dime’s worth of difference.”  What features does he see them as having in common?  Why does he not share these points of view?  What are the implications for his view of the human person?
  1. Like Plato, Nietzsche sees us as being trapped in a sort of “cave” where we have a false perception of ourselves and of reality.  What keeps us in this cave of misperception and how?  How do we break out?  What sort of life should we strive for and why?
  1. “Nietzsche is really closer to Augustine than to the Buddhist, since for him the self is to be affirmed rather than abolished.”  What can be said in support of this claim?  What can be said against it?

Instructions – Follow Carefully!

  1. Answer the first question and one of the second two.  Your essay should be typed, double-spaced, and about six pages in length, three pages per question.
  1. Be sure that your paper has a separate title page, with your name, class, and date clearly marked.  Make sure it is clear which question you are answering and begin your answer to a question on a fresh page.  Do NOT put your name on the headers or footers in the body of the paper.  The same rules for documentation and plagiarism for the term papers apply to the final exam.

 

These are the names of the books, it is not a research paper

 A Plato Reader: Eight Essential Dialogues (Hackett)

https://play.google.com/books/reader?id=f2yn0T8U-a8C&printsec=frontcover&output=reader&hl=en&pg=GBS.PP1

Augustine: The Confessions, 2nd edition (Hackett)

Nietzsche, The Genealogy of Morality (Hackett)

http://www.inp.uw.edu.pl/mdsie/Political_Thought/GeneologyofMorals.pdf

WalpolaRahula, What the Buddha Taught (Grove Press)

http://www.dhammaweb.net/books/Dr_Walpola_Rahula_What_the_Buddha_Taught.pdf

 

error: